Tag Archives: HelenMoyesDesigns

Sew your own style

Sharing my sewing adventures to show how to add a lining. Add a lining to take your sewing from home made to haute couture. Sew your own style.

Blue Trench Coat

My Spring wardrobe would not be complete without  a coat to keep the blustery showers at bay.

Blue is a favourite of mine so I can choose to wear my blue boots or blue court shoes to complete the outfit. What colour coat would best suit you and your wardrobe? Sew your own style.

 

I used Simple Sew The Trench Coat pattern and some blue suiting from a local tailor.

Simple Sew Trench Coat pattern

This coat pattern is a flattering belted style without buttons. however it is short for a coat, and there in no guidance for adding a lining.

Haute couture

I made it more versatile to wear over a wider range of clothes, and in a range of weather by increasing the length.

Haute couture is French for “high sewing” or “high dressmaking” or “high fashion” and is the creation of exclusive custom-fitted clothing. Not as difficult as the term may suggest, and is all about getting clothes right for you and not the same as anyone else. Sew your own style

Adding a lining

Rose & Hubble fabric for the lining

I chose some lovely Rose & Hubble cotton for the lining. The lining of a coat can be extra special, almost like a secret between the wearer and the coat, which can be chosen to be shared, or not!
I’m not a fan of slippery man-made fabric linings, as they can wear out quite fast, and be sweaty (this could just be me of course?!). I prefer a natural fabric which is more breathable, and in this case I chose a hard wearing cotton. I do tend to sling my coat around, when out and about in the car, or under seats etc at venues so they do need to stand up to this treatment!

What do you need to take into account?

The great thing about adding a lining is that all your seams are covered up so although they need finishing to stop any fraying, you don’t have to feel they will be open to inspection.

First things first, I always wash fabric so if there is going to be any shrinkage, it is before making.

While the fabric drys, inspect the pattern construction and instructions and decide on any alterations you want. I  lengthened the belt as well as both the bodice and skirt length.

Cuting out in my kitchen as the worktop height is kinder on my back. I love using my fabric weights. Quicker and easier than pinning, especially with thick fabric. You can find these in my Etsy shop. I ship worldwide from Yorkshire. I’m also happy to create a custom order for you, if there is a particular colour or design you would like. Just let me know.

Using Fabric Weights

The lining pieces are the same as the main body (no need for the belt or facing though).

The sleeves and back pattern pieces are cut out the same as for the main fabric pieces.

You can see here where I use the main fabric piece to get the same length – this shows how much length I added – tall girls need more fabric!

Planning the lining

Use the pattern markings for grain and fold lines for the lining.

Cutting out the lining pieces

However, because the lining is attached to the facing, the front lining pieces don’t want to be as wide as the main fabric front pieces.

In this pattern there’s lots of fullness from pleats in the front skirt pieces, which I din’t want in the lining, as it would be far too bulky.

You can see here how I pinned the pleats on the front skirt pattern piece and folded in the facing width to create my lining pattern piece.

adjusting the pattern for the lining

Sewing  in the lining

Make up the lining as a second version of the garment. If curves need clipping do this after neatening the edges. I love using pinking scissors for finishing seams of cotton fabric.

constructing the lining

I hung my nearly finished garments up, to allow gravity to work and see how it would hang in wear.  I checked the sizing before sewing  together. The lining garment is placed wrong side to the wrong side of the main garment once the facing and lining  are sewn together right sides together.

 

hanging during construction

The lining needs to be 2 – 3 inches shorter than the outer coat and I didn’t hem them separately, but chose to sew the hems right sides together and then turn through.

At this stage there are no sleeves.

Sleeves

The sleeve is inserted into the main garment, right sides together with even gethering.

insert the sleeve

You won’t get a smooth lining finish if you don’t hand stitch the lining sleeve top, or head, in place. So, first sew the wrist part of the lining and sleeve together. Place right sides together with the lining on the outside. Machine stitch the wrist circle and then turn the sleeve lining to the inside of the sleeve. Match up the side seams and ensure it isn’t twisted.

Fold over the top edge of the sleeve lining and slip stitch it to the lining bodice, matching the undearm seams. Careful hand stitching here really does finish the garment off well.

The other thing I added to finish my coat, was silver top stitch along the front edge, all around the collar. Along with clipping the seams, and tapering the collar point, this really helps the collar to lie flat aswell as finishing the garment. Some extra attention to finishing details really helps to sew your own style. I am thinking about which sewist brooch to add.

front of finished coat

back of finished coat

I’m looking forward to the end of wintery weather here, so I can step out in my blue coat. What clothesmaking would help you to sew your own style?

Enjoying My Textile Art Landscapes

Helen Moyes Designs Landscape cards 20162

This Summer my Landscape Textile Art cards have been popular, especially on the cream card. These are available at my Etsy Shop Helen Moyes Designs

I have started to produce Card Kits so that others can get creative with (most) of the necessary materials to hand.

I thought I would share with you here the process of making up the cards so that if, like me, you have lots of fabric scraps you could have a go yourself.

I love to produce sky effects with two of my favourite materials: tyvek and brusho paints.

Made from 100% polyethylene, Tyvek® can be used to create many unique surface effects. It shrinks and bubbles when heat is applied – which is another story I will save for another time. Tyvek produces interesting distressed/3D effects when used with a heat gun, can be moulded, overprinted and layered. I use different weights of Tyvek for different textile art. I cover  the different uses in my popular Paint and Stitch workshop. Future workshops can be seen on my facebook page.

Tyvek Paper

For the landscape sky,  I like the stability of Tyvek Heavy Weight Paper

You may have a tyvek envelope that has been sent to you that you can open up and upcycle!

BrushoImage

Brusho® is a non toxic,  water-based paint medium. It’s super-highly-pigmented, unpredictable and it’s bags of fun to paint with and you only need a small amount as it goes a long way. I use it on paper, fabric as well as on tyvek. It works really well on watercolour paper. It is made in Sheffield by Colourcraft.

I wet the tyvek paper and then sparingly sprinkle on some brusho powders. You can use a brush to alter the spontaneous design.

When dry, cut the painted tyvek the right size for a third of the card design. The size will depend on the size card you use and how much of the card front you want to have as textile. The card border really adds to the finished design so don’t make your textile too big!
I use a piece of calico as the base for the land and attach this to the tyvek sky with a row of stitch.

Another textile art material I love to use are silk carrier rods. Again I buy local

silk carrier rod

Silk carrier rods are a by-product produced during the silk reeling proces, They come in lots of different colours, including varigated, which I also use in my art and workshops. They contain the natural gum which makes them quite rigid, but they can be split down into thinner layers which are more pliable. Put the piece of natural silk carrier rod into water to soak.

Helen Moyes Designs Textile Art Landscapes 2
This will be used for clouds later.

Layer different textile pieces to create a landscape.

Helen Moyes Designs Textile Art Landscapes 3

Audition pieces until you are happy with the effect.
Choose appropriate threads. As a minimum use a green for the land and a whitish one for the sky. I love to use embroidery threads, especially varigated ones.

Sew along one of the layered fabric pieces, to join it to the calico base. I usually start at the horizon.
When you reach the side, turn around and come back, incorporating more pieces as you move down the picture.
You can stitch by hand or by machine.

 

Helen Moyes Designs Textile Art Landscapes 4

Trim the sides You can use the off cut to add depth in the foreground as shown

Helen Moyes Designs Textile Art Landscapes 6

Helen Moyes Designs Textile Art Landscapes 5

Take the silk carrier rod from the water and gently tease it out to create wispy pieces that can be used for clouds.

Helen Moyes Designs Textile Art Landscapes 8

I also use some sheep wool that I collect from barbed wire when out on walks. Arrange these and stitch down.

Helen Moyes Designs Textile Art Landscapes 9

Add some details, such as trees, using small scraps of fabric and stitching. Variegated thread and different kinds of stitch can produce good details.

Helen Moyes Designs Textile Art Landscapes 10

Helen Moyes Designs Landscape cards 2016 detail

When your design is finished, apply double sided tape or glue to the back and attach to the front of the card. Don’t forget to initial your design!

Helen Moyes Designs Landscape cards 20164

I would really like to see your textile landscapes and to hear how you get on. Please comment below or email me.